Frequently Asked Questions


FAQ

CAN I ORDER FISH AND PRODUCTS TOGETHER SO I CAN SAVE ON SHIPPING?

Sorry, but we don't do that for a couple reasons. First, it would cost more, since the fish are being shipped by overnight rates, additional weight or box size, would add greatly to the cost, making it more expensive - sometimes a lot more. Second, we don't want to compromise the safety of the fish in any way. Many products would not ship well with fish. In addition, the hatchery is not in the same location as the warehouse, so it would be very inconvenient when it comes to packaging everything together. Our shopping cart will not allow you to add any other product on an order containing fish.


CAN I PICK UP MY FISH AT YOUR LOCATION?

Sorry, but we are not open to the public at this time. All fish must be shipped. If you are nearby, they can often go by Ground at a very inexpensive rate. 


WHEN WILL YOU HAVE A BREEDING PAIR AVAILABLE?

Unfortunately, this is not something we can predict. We do not sell them until they are proven fertile with a good hatch rate and produce fry that swim vigorously. As soon as we see this, we post them as available. Before that, we don't know how close they might be to being "proven", or if they'll ever be good. We announce all new pairs (along with other fish becoming available) on Facebook, so if you follow us there, you will see the post in your feed. 


YOU ARE OUT OF STOCK ON THE FISH I WANT. CAN YOU PUT ME ON A WAITING LIST OR NOTIFY ME WHEN THEY ARE READY?

We do not keep waiting lists. We tried that in the past and it was extraordinarily time consuming and resulted in most people not actually waiting. It also greatly delayed the shipping of fish which were ready to go and our business can't survive doing that.  Our policy is to sell to the first person who sees them on the site and buys them. This way, everyone has a chance and doesn't have to wait for us to get through dozens of people on a waiting list before we get to you. You can sign up to be on our email list (bottom of home page), if you want email notifications when we have something new available. 


DO YOU HAVE RED KOI?

No, we do not. Our koi are orange. Some of the best adults can develop a reddish hue to the orange, but they are still not red. So, what about all the other people advertising red koi? Well, all we can say is that we think you'll be disappointed if you are expecting red colored fish to arrive. Keep in mind that photography can fool you in regards to color. It is very easy to make a fish look like you want on the internet. You can read about this issue in more detail here


WHAT TANK SIZE CAN YOUR SPONGE FILTERS HANDLE?

Filters are designed to handle bio-load, not a particular tank size. Although companies tend to rate their filters to tank size, this is not accurate. Filters are capable of containing a certain number of nitrifying bacteria that will consume a particular volume of ammonia and nitrites. A certain sized bio-load in a small tank will require the approximately the same filtration as the same bio-load in a large tank. However, since the tank walls and other items also contain nitrifying bacteria, the same bio-load in a smaller tank will require a slightly larger filter size than the large tank.

To rate our filters, try to compare volume of sponge used and the density of the sponge compared to other filters. Our opinion is that bio-filtration is typically not a limiting factor in most tanks. It is more important to get a filter with a good design. The best filters are made with waterproof reticulated foam and designed to get the sponge close to the bottom of the tank, which will improve water movement to the filter and gas exchange at the surface. When raising fry, you also need a filter that small fry will not get trapped under. Our sponge filters handle this combination of factors better than any other, in our opinion. It's easy enough to add more if you think you need them. 


MY FISH WILL NOT EAT. WHAT IS WRONG?

First, it's very important to determine why it isn't eating. Stress can come from many sources that might cause them to stop feeding. It may simply be frightened. Are there any symptoms other than not eating? If the fish swims normally, looks normal and acts normal, then it's not likely a bacterial infection or an external parasite. It could have an internal parasite such as a nematode, flagellate or other parasite. It could also be recovering from the stress of transportation or many other possible issues.

Unless you have a microscope and the knowledge to identify the possible parasites, then the best course of action is to see if changing simple things might help - like turning off the light, covering the sides, making sure the bottoms and tank sides are dark, reducing current, adding more hiding places, etc. If nothing else seems to work, then maybe it's a parasite (this would not be the case if you recently got the fish from us). A heat treatment might be the next choice if you are sure it's a parasite. Caution: do not use heat if the fish is bloated, fins are clamped, has a thick slime coat, has ragged fins or red streaks in the body/fins. Heat helps with parasite problems, but is harmful if bacteria, fungus or viruses are the issue.

Raise the temperature over a period of 24 hrs to 95-96° F. Hold it there for 7-10 days. Make sure aeration is good. When feeding, offer only one bite to each fish. It's very important to not offer more, even if they eat the bite. If they don't eat it within 2 minutes, remove the uneaten food. If you do not, then expect to fail. Food left in water of this temperature will spoil very quickly and will likely turn the fish off to that particular food forever. If the fish does eat the bite, then repeat this procedure every few hours for the next 2 days. After that, slightly increase the amount of food offered each day until it is eating normally. After 10 days, slowly lower the temperature over a 24 hour period.


I DON'T HAVE AN EXTRA TANK TO QUARANTINE THE NEW FISH. WILL THEY BE OKAY IF I ADD THEM TO MY EXISTING TANK WHEN THEY ARRIVE?

They might be okay, but it's risky to skip the quarantine procedure. They will be stressed from shipping and most vulnerable to all kinds of problems when you first receive them. First, there may be pathogens in your tank that the existing fish are immune to, but the stressed fish will not be. Second, existing fish may have territories they want to protect and can pick on the new arrivals, who won't even know where the hiding spots might be. Another important factor is the food you will be putting in for your existing fish. The new arrivals should not be fed for around 48 hours and then only very lightly for the first week. You have no way to control this if they are mixed in with fish you are feeding normally. Quarantine for at least 30 days is very important to the long term health of your new fish.