Longfin Confusion

Longfin Confusion

For years I have watched people offer standard fin bristlenose for sale to people, stating that these fish carried a gene for longfin. I felt very bad for the people wasting their money and worse wasting the next year or two raising and breeding these standard bristlenose just to findout that all of the babies would look just like mom and dad. As recently as last week we received a call from a customer wanting to place an order for some standard fin, or “normal” super-red bristlenose that carry the longfin gene. It is an understandable mistake to think that the gene that is responsible for the longfin trait might be recessive, but this misunderstanding has been going on far too long now. We are primarily known for our work with angelfish since we have worked with the longfins or veiltails in angels since the 1970’s. It is well known, and has been for years, that the gene responsible for veiltail in angelfish is dominant. In other words, if the fish carries a gene for longfin, it will be a longfin.  An article written in 1982 for FAMA magazine by. Joanne Norton described the veiltail gene as follows: Veiltail in angelfish is due to an autosomal (not on a sex chromosome) dominant gene (Sterba). A double dose of the gene for veiltail results in a very long, droopy tail. The double-dose veiltail is smaller and less vigorous than the single-dose veiltail and is not a prolific breeder. A mating in which both parents are single-dose veiltail is unsatisfactory because this produces 25% normal, 50% single-dose veiltail, and 25% double-dose veiltail. You...